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holystove

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holystove last won the day on June 12 2017

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About holystove

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  • Birthday 21/06/1984

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  1. By 'Democrats' I was referring to the people who vote in the primaries, not the candidates (who I assume are all principled and genuinely believe they are the best person to lead the USA). If you are voting in the primary, you might prefer Sanders because his agenda is the most 'left' (purity), but you should be aware once the general public get to vote, they might think your candidate too extreme (electability);
  2. The parallels between Sanders and Corbyn are uncanny (even down to how their supporters hound people on social media who dare question the leader). If he wins the nomination, my guess is Trump is set for another 4 years because, just like in the UK, the majority will not choose to go with the revolutionary, no matter how much they disdain Trump. Seems the UK is really ahead of the curve. They got there first with Brexit (Trump) and Corbyn (Sanders). Democrats should take note of this and take away the approriate lessons (go for electability, not purity). Fwiw, I think Klobuchar would stand the best chance of beating Trump.
  3. 0,03% last elections. 🤦‍♂️
  4. I must say the reports on the celebrations were indeed framed as nationalism. EU continentals who only have a passing intrest in brexit, still view it with disbelief. The next phase will be very interesting. The project is most definitely now on brexiters and you can already sense the nervousness. I see only two outcomes. Brexit will either be a democratic failure if the UK continues to follow EU rules without a say to protect its economy ; or it will be an economic failure if the UK tries to sever ties to its biggest economic partner.
  5. For the foreseeable future, the answer to every question about the future relationship will be 'it depends'.
  6. I see two reasons for this: 1) UK leaving the EU on January 31 was decided by the December 2019 election, so the real 'elation' for brexiters was when the election result became clear. Today is just an inevitable consequence of that result. 2) for all pratical purposes, the UK will still be an EU member until January 2021. It is only from 2021 on, that your every day life will be impacted by Brexit.
  7. Economic integration requires political integration. You can't have common rules, if there is no political platform to discuss what those rules should be. Increased cooperation (= federalism) is therefor a natural process. All countries in the EU are sovereign; being an EU member increases their sovereingty as it allows them to project power beyond what they would achieve alone. The EU, aside from being the biggest single market in itself, has, by far, the most free trade deals in the world of any economic entity. Your statement it is the most protectionist is one of the more meaningless you have made on here.
  8. Another Boeing goes down. Do you fly Boeings (the 737 MAX perhaps?) ? Any difference in safety with Airbus planes?
  9. Reading up in this... So he stood for re-election, was rejected by the people and was then made a 'lord' so he could continue in government, ie rule the people that rejected him. To pick up an old theme: who do you have to vote for to get rid of Zac Goldsmith?
  10. Jess Phillips would eat Johnson alive every single PM's questions.
  11. Yes the conservatives won a clear majority within the system, not disputing that. I was just having a dig at John who always rails against the undemocratic nature of the EU.
  12. Conservatives got 358 on 43.6% of the vote. Labour and Lib Dems got 214 on 43.8% of the vote. Labour + LibDem + SNP + Greens + Plaid Cymru + Sinn Fein + SDLP + Alliance = 52,2% of the vote. A majority of people voted for parties which opposed the Brexit deal and were pledging to put it back to the people in a second referendum. etc. etc. 😉
  13. There is one thing I don't understand. All those Tories who believe a hard brexit will damage the UK, but will still vote Johnson because they fear Corbyn will do more harm to the economy. How can these Tories not understand that a hard brexit would do much more harm to the UK economy than a Corbyn-led minorty government could ever do? Looking at it from this side of the Channel, there are two possible outcomes: * Tory majority : withdrawal deal passes, much more difficult phase two starts which either crashes at the end of 2020 or lasts for multiple years. * Labour-SNP-LibDem coalition, in which SNP will get its indyref, LibDem will get their second referendum, but there is not a chance in hell Corbyn will get his "gigafactories". At most, UK will be run like the average EU country with a socialist government in power. I would just go with this : https://tactical.vote/
  14. May also got her deal agreed with the EU. Key question is, will it pass the House of Commons?
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