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Jutkiewicz Booed At Huddersfield

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http://www.terrier-bytes.com/article.html?...amp;date=220309

 

It was only when Danny Cadamarteri came on for Lukas Jutkiewicz with 32 minutes gone that Town really started to get going.

The on-loan Everton striker made a fuss about being substituted after being booed off by the Town fans, appearing to have thrown his training top in the direction of manager Lee Clark. Clark has said in the interview after the game that the 19-year old has apologized to Clark, his fellow players and also to the fans, the youngster needs to buck up his ideas if he can’t cut it in League One what chance has he got in the Premiership? I wouldn’t be surprised if he sent back to Everton sometime in the near future.

 

Lee Clark said:

 

"Lukas is a young boy and he was very emotional at half-time. He made a mistake and he has apologised to me, the staff and the players and he wants to apologise to all the Huddersfield fans. He is a young lad and he isn't the first to make a mistake when being substituted. I made one of the highest-profile mistakes ever after being substituted at the Dell in 1994 - I kicked a steel bucket when Kevin Keegan took me off and I have been there.

 

 

"I know the fans didn't take to it too nicely, but I told the defenders that they had let Lukas down at half-time. At 2-0 down I had to make a change at the top end of the pitch and I brought Danny Cadamarteri on even though it was the defenders who had let me down. I could have brought any of the ten outfield players off, but we needed that bit of pace up top to stretch them.

 

 

"I hope the fans can forgive him. I know they rightly love their club and they have been terrific in getting behind the team, but he has apologised for reacting in that manner and he is emotional and apologises for what he did to everyone connected with Huddersfield Town Football Club. He is with us until the end of the season and we will work with him - he is a lovely lad and he is trying his very best. It was unfortunate, but let's give him a chance and not hang him out to dry - let's back him."

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Like Clark said everyone makes mistakes. With the team being 2-0 down Lukas will have felt pretty pissed at being the man to sit on the sidelines. He's not took it in the right manner but it's only his first offence. With some work from the Huddersfield coaching staff he will be ready for the Premiership. It's never going to be easy making it and he just needs to stay on track. His attitude seems to be right after the match, his apology to the fans, manager and players shows what kind of a lad he is. I just hope that he can get on with his football and the Town fans can forgive him.

 

"Lukas is a young boy and he was very emotional at half-time. He made a mistake and he has apologised to me, the staff and the players and he wants to apologise to all the Huddersfield fans. He is a young lad and he isn't the first to make a mistake when being substituted. I made one of the highest-profile mistakes ever after being substituted at the Dell in 1994 - I kicked a steel bucket when Kevin Keegan took me off and I have been there.

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Hmmmm...

 

"...he is a lovely lad and he is trying his very best."

 

....doesn't sound very hopeful. And being replaced by someone we ditched seven years ago because he wasn't good enough :unsure: . CadburyMartini's a journeyman at best. Think the chances of him ever playing for us are remote....love to be wrong though :) .

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Doesn't sound very hopeful.

 

You have to remember his age Mike. He is only 19 and is just a little slow at getting into the swing of football. I don't have massive high hopes for the lad but I don't want to write him off either. His attitude after the event seems to be good and this could be the turning point. He now has a point to prove to the Town fans and this could be what makes him into a good footballer.

 

The point you made about Cadematari was right but could that just be experiance? Danny has experiance with football and Lukas dosen't, at 2-0 down the gaffer might have used this as a weapon to get back into the game. Danny's experiance could have been what won him a place on the field.

 

I hope your wrong Mike, wish him all the best.

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....doesn't sound very hopeful. And being replaced by someone we ditched seven years ago because he wasn't good enough :unsure: . CadburyMartini's a journeyman at best. Think the chances of him ever playing for us are remote....love to be wrong though :).

 

You have to remember his age Mike. He is only 19 and is just a little slow at getting into the swing of football. I don't have massive high hopes for the lad but I don't want to write him off either. His attitude after the event seems to be good and this could be the turning point. He now has a point to prove to the Town fans and this could be what makes him into a good footballer.

 

This is a perfect example of the same thing I was trying to say when everyone was getting on Fellaini a few weeks ago. Players at 17, 19, 21 are still learning how to be professionals. A player can have all the physical gifts in the world and still be a failure because he never grasps the mental side of the game, or because he's so immature that he lets his emotions dictate his performance. We have a saying for athletes like that in the US - "million dollar body, ten cent head." Conversely, a player of limited ability can still carve out a long and successful career for himself if he's smart and able to make the most of what he does have. But a lot of that mental attitude, at both ends of the spectrum, is a product of maturity and experience. That is something most players that young simply do not have yet, even the best ones (for instance, look at the 30-year-old Tiger Woods vs. the 20-year-old Tiger Woods - as good as he was then, he's that much better now, after ten years of being a pro). And that's why I'm reluctant to treat any player too harshly at that age. Some will remain immature idiots their entire careers, of course, as the likes of Riquelme will attest, but most of them will grow out of it eventually. Now if they simply cannot play, that's different. But we know Fellaini can play when his head's in the game, and I assume Lukas can play as well, or else Moyes wouldn't have forked out £1m to buy him and the Polish U21 program wouldn't have him on their radar screen. As embarrassing as it is, this is a good learning experience for young Lukas, and if he takes it to heart it will make him a better player in the long run. At the least, I hope it will teach him to trust his coaches, that if they make a move they have a good reason for it, even if he can't see it.

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Your argument doesnt hold water JD.

 

These players have been playing since they where 15 years old and longer, they should know all they need to know by the time they reach 21, they are probably at the fittest they will ever be, they are able to run, shoot, tackle, control and pass a ball, and should last the pace better now than they will in five years time. Rooney was just as good at 17 as he is now, dont think he has improved at all, and thats the same with lots of players. I dont go along with peeps saying he's young, give him time, making youth an excuse for putting in bad performances is no excuse at all. imo.

 

If your good enough your old enough.

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Maybe I just have a different perspective as an American, Bill, because I'm so used to watching young players in this country, especially 18-22 year olds, developing and improving right before my eyes on television. University sports are all over the TV here, secondary school sports are starting to get TV coverage - hell, even the little league world series (youth baseball) gets massive amounts of TV coverage, and those are 12 year olds playing! Most of the guys who make it to the pros in this country have been playing their sport year-round since they were 8 or 9, and despite that most of them are STILL developing their games for several more years even after they reach the highest level. It is very rare to see a player step into a pro league at 18 or 19 and play with the poise and smarts of a 15-year veteran. It does happen, but only on very, very, VERY rare occasions...99.999% of the players who go to the pros do not step in and play their best ball right from day one. So it is strongly ingrained in the culture of sports fans in this country to give players at least two or three years to adapt and learn how to play at the top level before we write them off as busts, especially if they demonstrated a high degree of potential at the lower levels - youth leagues, university, lesser pro leagues, and so on. If you told a sports fan in this country that a player who is 17, or even 21, should already be just as good as he will be at 25 or 30, you'd get a lot of very strange looks, because that's completely contrary to all the evidence we see on television in this country every day. NOBODY here would expect a 21 year old to be as good as he will be at 25 or 30, unless it's one of those sports like gymnastics or figure skating where 16 is the prime of their career and 25 is retirement age. But in a team sport, someone who's 25 still has at least a good ten or fifteen years in front of him if he stays healthy.

 

Now there's one thing where I will agree with you - having the physical ability to kick butt is important, and if you don't have the right physical tools your sports career is going to be pretty short. If a guy starts off his career as a high level pro and it's obvious within just a few games that he's completely overmatched, then no, not even American fans are going to give him three years to learn, and most likely neither is the team. You might notice, for instance, that I'm not arguing with the people who have written off Segundo Castillo. :P But when guys do have the skills, it's often that mental side that makes the difference between the superstar, the ordinary pro, and the bust. In other words, learning how to kick butt is also an important piece of the puzzle, and that's the part that the majority of young players need to be allowed the time to figure out. If you show me a player who hasn't improved his game since he was 17, who doesn't learn from past mistakes and still makes the typical young player's error of relying too much on his talent and not enough on tactics and smart play, then I'll show you a player who's either poorly coached, dumb as a rock, or so lazy that he can't be arsed to work hard enough to make himself a better pro. But to say that young players should be capable of playing like seasoned veterans, which is what you seem to be stating or implying, well sorry, but when it comes to the vast majority of professional athletes across all team sports that's just not been my experience. A very select few might be able to pull that off, but normally it just doesn't happen.

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Good post JD, but I'd agree with Bill. Football is a different animal. The best examples I can give at the moment are probably Cesc Fabregas or Lionel Messi. Both really young guys, 21 (my age), both playing at the highest level in the world. Fabreags is on the short-list of best midfielders in the world, and Messi is the list of best strikers.

 

That is the potential acheivable at a young age, the age factor is usually mainly determined by position. Goalkeepers tend to be better toward the latter years, they have lots of experience and presence and they don't have to move a lot during their careers so they can still stay very physical fit and sharp mentally as they get older. Defenders are the same but usually peak a bit earlier, late 20's. They have a lot of experience but they still have physical command and power. Midfielders fluctuate the most but usually are better younger still, combining their physicality and tactical awareness best aroud the early 20's.

 

While your strikers, which the young lad in question is, blossom early. And only improve with age through confidence of being good when they were younger. I've never heard of a striker who was brilliant at 25 but shit at 20....

 

Jutkiewiscz hasn't made much noise, and while I'm sure with nuturing he could be good, he should still be able to throw out some attitude and bang in a few goals, which he doesn't.

 

James Vaughan is a good example, full of power and pace and an eye for goal, if he can cure his injury problem, he'll be great. But we already know he's good. Lukas just isn't, and by that token, he'll probably make a good Championship striker. It's nothing down on him, he'll probably play in a top flight further down his career, he might even be a hero for a team, but not at the same standard as a premier league striker.

 

Your Michael Owen's and your Wayne Rooney's were already setting the world alight when they were 18...and we sold ours and kept Jutkiewiscz <_<

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While your strikers, which the young lad in question is, blossom early. And only improve with age through confidence of being good when they were younger. I've never heard of a striker who was brilliant at 25 but shit at 20....

 

Luka Toni, Inzaghi, Eto'o?? All strikers who grew better in scoring goals with age.

strikers aren't a different kind of people so they don't blossom earlier then any other kind of player.

 

Never saw jutkiewicz play, but he must have some potential i guess, if he's still contracted.

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nick chadwick had potential, look at him. Jeffers had fucking potential :lol: fox in the box to wenger.

Ive seen Jutiewicz play and was far from impressed, not going to make it imo.

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