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Josh Berno

Could Yakubu Be An Everton Legend?

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A thought just popped into my head while looking at a Everton history book of Dixe Dean, Grame Sharp all the goalscoring legends and I was thinking could Yakubu be one of them in years to come if he stays at Everton?

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Woah... slow down guys... one hat-trick doesn't make him a legend. Remember he was slow to start off with early in the season, and people were sniffing for blood then. Give him a bit more time.

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Had that had-tirck come against the shite he'd probably be automatically classed as a legend!

Really tho, to be a legend requires 3+ years of being on top of your game so a long way to go but if he carries on.......who knows.

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Zed    1
Had that had-tirck come against the shite he'd probably be automatically classed as a legend!

Really tho, to be a legend requires 3+ years of being on top of your game so a long way to go but if he carries on.......who knows.

 

#wow three years to be a legend

 

Standards have fallen

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#wow three years to be a legend

 

Standards have fallen

 

So what's your criteria for being a legend or did you just want to post for sake of posting?

 

Many would class rooney a legend - 2 seasons

Andy Gray - 2 seasons

Dave Hickson - 4 seasons

Gary Lineker - 1 season

Tommy Lawton - 2 seasons

Fred Pickering - 3 seasons

Mike Trebilcock - 2 seasons

 

:lol:

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So what's your criteria for being a legend or did you just want to post for sake of posting?

 

Many would class rooney a legend - 2 seasons

Andy Gray - 2 seasons

Dave Hickson - 4 seasons

Gary Lineker - 1 season

Tommy Lawton - 2 seasons

Fred Pickering - 3 seasons

Mike Trebilcock - 2 seasons

 

:lol:

My criteria for legendary status would be ........

 

At least four seasons of good solid performances as Goalkeeper, Midfielder, or Defender, approaching the 200 appearances mark.

For Attackers my criteria again would be at least four seasons of good displays and approaching the 100 goals Target.

So i think we will have to wait a few years before we can ascertain if Yakubu will become a legend or not.

 

Of those you mentioned i would certainly rate Hickson close to legendary status, he in fact signed for everton in 1948, but 3 years of his playing career were spent in the Forces and he didnt make his début till 1951 his record is still better than Most.

243 appearences scoring 111 goals.

 

Tommy Lawton was in fact on our books for 7 years but the war years meant he missed 5 seasons but played 87 games and scored 70 goals.

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Lineker is by no stretch of the imagination an Everton legend, an English legend who spent one very productive season with us(in terms of goals but not trophies), certainly. Maybe a Spurs legend possibly, but not Everton.

Mike Trebilcock played a pivotal part in one of the most notable games in our history and will always be remembered for that, but not a legend.

Andy Gray is a bit of a more grey area ( :D ). One of the catalysts for the most glorious period in our history, but I think he'll always be remembered as part of a legendary team rather than a legend in his own right.

 

Yakubu? Course he could....in time..but then a lot of people though BT could as well :unsure: .

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What makes a player a legend ..... Stories like this of a player spilling Blood and guts for the Blue shirt.

 

Dave Hickson - Player Profile

Born Salford, 30 October 1929 - Position: Centre Forward

 

Dave Hickson started his football career as a teenager with non-league Ellesmere Port, where his robust style and keen eye for goal were noticed by the Everton manager Cliff Britton.

He signed for the Toffes in 1948, but National Service in the army would delay his début for another three years. Some of this time spent playing for the Cheshire Army Cadets team, and it was with them that he was coached by the Everton legend Dixie Dean.

 

It is fairly safe to assume that Dave developed the physical side of his game in this period.

 

Hickson made his début for Everton in September 1951 against Leeds United, with the Blues in the Second Division for only the second season in their history. Hickson was soon a regular fixture in the Everton side, and his physical approach as a centre forward, coupled with his determination soon made him a crowd favourite.

 

Off the pitch, Hickson was a different man, quiet and unassuming, but the Dave Hickson that pulled on a Blue shirt and entered battle every Saturday afternoon was an aggressive character, no quarter given or asked.

 

This aggression would lead to several run-ins with officials, and three sendings off during his career, but that was his style & the fans loved it.

A youthful Hickson with his striking appearance, fully quiffed up with a shock of blonde hair, as was the style of the day, was one of the few things to get excited about on the terraces of Goodison Park.

 

Dave Hickson soon forged a productive partnership with John Willie Parker, with Hickson being the target man. Although his reputation as an aerial threat was well known, Hickson was also a difficult opponent with the ball on the floor, and could produce a powerful shot, which earned him the nickname Cannonball Kid.

 

Perhaps the defining moment in Dave's career came in Evertons FA Cup run in the 1952/3 season. The Blues were still in Division Two, and the cup was to provide some well needed excitement for the Goodison Park faithful. Two home wins against Ipswich Town & Nottingham Forest pitched Everton into the Fifth round, where they would draw the awesome Manchester United.

A feverish crowd of 77,920 packed Goodison Park on 14 Feb 1953 expectant of a thrilling encounter, and they would not be disappointed.

United had the better of early exchanges and as expected took the lead just before the half hour. Everton were lifted just minutes later, when Tommy Eglinton nipped in to score an equaliser lifting the crowd and inspiring Everton. Just before Half Time Dave Hickson launched himself headlong in amongst flying boots and emerged with a huge gash above one eyebrow.

Hickson was lead off down the tunnel, with the crowd fully expecting Everton to play the remainder with 10 men, as substitutes were not yet permitted.

Dave Hickson had other ideas. He emerged from the tunnel in the second half, greeted by a huge ovation from the crowd, with a row of freshly applied stitches holding the wound together. Minutes later Hickson applied the finish that would end up as the winning goal, and the crowd went wild.

Hickson then headed against the post and opened the wound again, and the blood began to pour in torrents, but still he soldiered on, ignoring pleas from both the referee and his captain to leave the field. At the final whistle, his blond hair now red, and his shirt the same colour as the Man Utd ones, he left the field to an ovation probably never bettered at Goodison.

 

 

And i was there. Dave Hickson aka The Cannonball kid one of many Everton Legends.

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