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14 minutes ago, MikeO said:

Boris Johnson accepts Matt Hancock’s apology for breaching social distancing rules and ‘considers matter closed’ – live | Politics | The Guardian

A longtime friend of Matt Hancock would have gone through a “very rigorous” process before being given a job at the health department, Grant Shapps has said, after photographs emerged of Hancock kissing the woman.

Uh-huh.

Something like: 'Gina, you were at university with Matt, weren't you? You have the job, then.'

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33 minutes ago, Formby said:

Boris Johnson accepts Matt Hancock’s apology for breaching social distancing rules and ‘considers matter closed’ – live | Politics | The Guardian

A longtime friend of Matt Hancock would have gone through a “very rigorous” process before being given a job at the health department, Grant Shapps has said, after photographs emerged of Hancock kissing the woman.

Uh-huh.

Something like: 'Gina, you were at university with Matt, weren't you? You have the job, then.'

£15,000 for 15-20 days a year? Few jobs like that would do wonders for the pension fund!

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I just read the cover story from this month's edition of The Atlantic. Titled "The Minister of Chaos", it was a story all about Boris Johnson. After reading it, I realized how little I actually knew about him and his politics and how he is running the country. 

The article mentioned that many of his policies would be considered far left of center here in the states, which surprised me. There was also some decent time spent on the comparisons between he and Trump. The biggest one I see are their "anti-establishment" stances (which helped propel both to the highest offices in the land), not to mention the xenophobia (which he denies, obviously.)

One major difference between the two that I found fascinating is that Trump's ego is so large (or tiny and fragile, depending on how you look at it), that he will never admit to being wrong, or admit to not being the best at something. Johnson plays up the role of bumbling fool and is openly self-depricating. That makes sense to me as a tactic to use in order to win voters. I will never understand how so many Americans are drawn to Trump's narcissism. 

To make a long story short, it was a fascinating article on what appears to be a fascinating person. I couldn't disagree more with the majority of his policies and beliefs, but he's definitely a character.

 

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53 minutes ago, dunlopp9987 said:

I just read the cover story from this month's edition of The Atlantic. Titled "The Minister of Chaos", it was a story all about Boris Johnson. After reading it, I realized how little I actually knew about him and his politics and how he is running the country. 

The article mentioned that many of his policies would be considered far left of center here in the states, which surprised me. There was also some decent time spent on the comparisons between he and Trump. The biggest one I see are their "anti-establishment" stances (which helped propel both to the highest offices in the land), not to mention the xenophobia (which he denies, obviously.)

One major difference between the two that I found fascinating is that Trump's ego is so large (or tiny and fragile, depending on how you look at it), that he will never admit to being wrong, or admit to not being the best at something. Johnson plays up the role of bumbling fool and is openly self-depricating. That makes sense to me as a tactic to use in order to win voters. I will never understand how so many Americans are drawn to Trump's narcissism. 

To make a long story short, it was a fascinating article on what appears to be a fascinating person. I couldn't disagree more with the majority of his policies and beliefs, but he's definitely a character.

Interesting take but calling Boris "anti-establishment" is just plain wrong, as you say he has the bumbling fool image but that's not him playing it up, it's just that he's a bumbling fool....and he's totally establishment (Eton and Oxford).

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2 minutes ago, MikeO said:

Interesting take but calling Boris "anti-establishment" is just plain wrong, as you say he has the bumbling fool image but that's not him playing it up, it's just that he's a bumbling fool....and he's totally establishment (Eton and Oxford).

Maybe anti-establishment was the wrong phrase. From what I read, he's very different from previous PM's in that he's not as proper and, for lack of a better term, presidential. That's what people apparently loved about Trump, was that he wasn't like "a normal politician." 

It seems to me that Johnson has sort of that same streak in him, that he's not your typical government leader.

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8 minutes ago, dunlopp9987 said:

Maybe anti-establishment was the wrong phrase. From what I read, he's very different from previous PM's in that he's not as proper and, for lack of a better term, presidential. That's what people apparently loved about Trump, was that he wasn't like "a normal politician." 

It seems to me that Johnson has sort of that same streak in him, that he's not your typical government leader.

He's an absolute cunt. And a dangerous one at that.

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6 minutes ago, dunlopp9987 said:

Maybe anti-establishment was the wrong phrase. From what I read, he's very different from previous PM's in that he's not as proper and, for lack of a better term, presidential. That's what people apparently loved about Trump, was that he wasn't like "a normal politician." 

It seems to me that Johnson has sort of that same streak in him, that he's not your typical government leader.

He fosters that image for sure and a large section of our society fall for it, but it's all forensically planned. That's the difference between him and Trump, Trump is just stupid and Johnson knows what he's doing.

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2 minutes ago, Hafnia said:

So what happens to the slimey toad now? Is that his career in politics over?  Probably get offered a consulting job at one of the companies he ploughed tax payers money in to. 

:rofl:

No. Now he goes private and makes even more money. 

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2 hours ago, Hafnia said:

So what happens to the slimey toad now? Is that his career in politics over?  Probably get offered a consulting job at one of the companies he ploughed tax payers money in to. 

I imagine he will be back in the cabinet or shadow cabinet in a few years time. 

I expect he will still be an MP until the next GE at least. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
1 hour ago, Romey 1878 said:

You can stay if you lie but you’re kicked out for calling a liar a liar.

Makes sense. 

There’s some sort of protocol in the commons where you can’t call a liar a liar even if proven that they have lied, and even worse if they do stand up and tell a blatant lie in the house they have some form of immunity from any form of prosecution, and if true Boris has pushed the boundaries of right and wrong further than anyone else, but he’s not a liar 🤥

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9 hours ago, pete0 said:

? He stands up for his MP and acknowledges the speakers position.  Played it well in my opinion. 

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34 minutes ago, Matt said:

? He stands up for his MP and acknowledges the speakers position.  Played it well in my opinion. 

Undermines his MP by then supporting the speakers decision. 

Like supporting a protest then saying the police are right to arrest you.

This government stinks.

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9 minutes ago, pete0 said:

Undermines his MP by then supporting the speakers decision. 

Like supporting a protest then saying the police are right to arrest you.

This government stinks.

He acknowledges the fact that the speaker did what she was legally obliged to do which is different from supporting her, she had no decision to make, she applied the rules as they stand.

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7 minutes ago, pete0 said:

Undermines his MP by then supporting the speakers decision. 

Like supporting a protest then saying the police are right to arrest you.

This government stinks.

Not even close to that in my opinion. That's defending his player and sweettalking the ref. 

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5 minutes ago, MikeO said:

He acknowledges the fact that the speaker did what she was legally obliged to do which is different from supporting her, she had no decision to make, she applied the rules as they stand.

There was no gun to their head to enforce it. 

If you were in charge would you have made the same decision?

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5 minutes ago, pete0 said:

There was no gun to their head to enforce it. 

If you were in charge would you have made the same decision?

It's the law so there was. I know you're ultra left wing Pete, but Starmer has done the right thing here. 

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5 minutes ago, pete0 said:

There was no gun to their head to enforce it. 

If you were in charge would you have made the same decision?

It's the law so there was. I know you're ultra left wing Pete, but Starmer has done the right thing here. 

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Just now, Matt said:

It's the law so there was. I know you're ultra left wing Pete, but Starmer has done the right thing here. 

I'd prefer to do what's right than what's lawful. 

Starmer is meant to be the opposition. He's the one who should have already been all over the lies. 

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17 minutes ago, pete0 said:

I'd prefer to do what's right than what's lawful. 

Starmer is meant to be the opposition. He's the one who should have already been all over the lies. 

Well so would I but that's not the world we live in. Laws should be respected, even stupid ones. Otherwise, laws are meaningless and the likes of the Torys get away with murder, even more than they do already.

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28 minutes ago, pete0 said:

There was no gun to their head to enforce it. 

If you were in charge would you have made the same decision?

There was no decision to make, as I said; speaker has no juristiction. It's a black/white situation, MPs aren't allowed by law to call other MPs liars in the house (even if they plainly are), had she allowed it she'd have been sacked the next day.

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2 minutes ago, Matt said:

Well so would I but that's not the world we live in. Laws should be respected, even stupid ones. Otherwise, laws are meaningless and the likes of the Torys get away with murder, even more than they do already.

That's the thing, it could be.

I don't know who could change things (I'd have liked Corbyn been given a go), but it won't be the likes of Starmer. 

 

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12 minutes ago, MikeO said:

There was no decision to make, as I said; speaker has no juristiction. It's a black/white situation, MPs aren't allowed by law to call other MPs liars in the house (even if they plainly are), had she allowed it she'd have been sacked the next day.

That could have been the big moment to get things changed. 

It's absolutely absurd that politicians can't call out the lies. That needs changing. Judith Cummins could have gone down in history but chose to hide behind the rules.

 

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On 23/07/2021 at 17:52, Bailey said:

It looks like she has used the stunt to make it a social media hit. 

What on earth is politics coming to these days. 

Was trying to remember this Douglas Adams quote, came back to me...

“The major problem—one of the major problems, for there are several—one of the many major problems with governing people is that of whom you get to do it; or rather of who manages to get people to let them do it to them.
To summarize: it is a well-known fact that those people who must want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it.
To summarize the summary: anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job.”

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